Traits of successful Risk Management professionals

5 Critical Traits of Successful Risk Management Professionals

  • Interpersonal
  • Systems Analysis/Process-Oriented— Determining how a system should work and how changes in conditions, operations, and the environment will affect outcomes.
  • Coordination — Adjusting actions in relation to others’ actions.
  • Complex Problem Solving/Proactive— Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Negotiation — Bringing others together and trying to reconcile differences.

Additional Traits of Successful Risk Management Professionals

Skills:

  • Reading Comprehension— Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening— Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Critical Thinking— Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Speaking— Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Systems Analysis/Process-Oriented— Determining how a system should work and how changes in conditions, operations, and the environment will affect outcomes.
  • Mathematics — Using mathematics to solve problems.
  • Negotiation — Bringing others together and trying to reconcile differences.
  • Systems Evaluation— Identifying measures or indicators of system performance and the actions needed to improve or correct performance, relative to the goals of the system.
  • Writing— Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Complex Problem Solving/Proactive— Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Judgment and Decision Making— Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Active Learning— Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Monitoring— Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Time Management— Managing one’s own time and the time of others.
  • Coordination — Adjusting actions in relation to others’ actions.
  • Persuasion— Persuading others to change their minds or behavior.
  • Social Perceptiveness— Being aware of others’ reactions and understanding why they react as they do.

Abilities:

  • Problem Sensitivity— The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • Deductive Reasoning— The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
  • Inductive Reasoning— The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
  • Oral Comprehension— The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Oral Expression— The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • Mathematical Reasoning— The ability to choose the right mathematical methods or formulas to solve a problem.
  • Written Comprehension— The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  • Near Vision— The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Written Expression— The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
  • Category Flexibility— The ability to generate or use different sets of rules for combining or grouping things in different ways.
  • Information Ordering— The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
  • Speech Clarity— The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.
  • Speech Recognition— The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person.
  • Flexibility of Closure— The ability to identify or detect a known pattern (a figure, object, word, or sound) that is hidden in other distracting material.
  • Number Facility— The ability to add, subtract, multiply, or divide quickly and correctly.
  • Fluency of Ideas— The ability to come up with a number of ideas about a topic (the number of ideas is important, not their quality, correctness, or creativity).

Work Styles:

  • Analytical Thinking— Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
  • Attention to Detail— Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Integrity— Job requires being honest and ethical.
  • Dependability— Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Initiative— Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
  • Cooperation— Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
  • Achievement/Effort— Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
  • Stress Tolerance— Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
  • Adaptability/Flexibility— Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
  • Persistence— Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
  • Independence— Job requires developing one’s own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
  • Leadership— Job requires a willingness to lead, take charge, and offer opinions and direction.
  • Self Control— Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
  • Innovation— Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.
  • Social Orientation— Job requires preferring to work with others rather than alone, and being personally connected with others on the job.
  • Concern for Others— Job requires being sensitive to others’ needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.

Work Values

  • Achievement— Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
  • Independence— Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
  • Recognition— Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.

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